Sidama Keramo - Ethiopia

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  • Regular price £11.00


Sidama Keramo G1
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Tasting Notes: Kiwi, Bergamot, Lemon finish
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Process: Fully Washed 
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Variety: JARC Selection 74158
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Elevation: 2260 - 2360 MASL
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Region: Sidama
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At the age of 16 I had never once enjoyed drinking coffee, maybe taking sips of my fathers instant coffee wasn't the best introduction, but I have fond memories of tasting a naturally processed Ethiopian coffee in the coffee shop I first started working in. I was blown away. I could honestly say, that particular Ethiopian coffee was the spark that ignited my passion for learning to produce the highest quality coffee possible.
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I've roasted a couple of naturally processed Ethiopian coffees in past years but a fully washed is first for me. I feel washed Ethiopian coffees became less popular than their natural counterparts in the late 2010s, for no particular reason other than it was the fashion at the time.
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I'm seriously impressed with how crisp and clean Sidama has come out. The distinction and clarity of flavours is remarkable. Kiwi and bergamot are the most prominent flavours I get with a lemon sherbet acidity to round it off. 
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The owner of the mill, Asefa Dukamo, was introduced to coffee at a young age as his parents were cultivating coffee and other garden crops. In his teens, he began to supply neighbouring coffee washing stations with cherries bought from nearby relatives and villagers in addition to his own family’s farm. He realised that there were not many washing stations nearby, and he had to travel great distances to deliver his coffee. Thus began the idea to construct his own washing station to reduce the travel time for coffee producers in his region.  

In 1997, he built a washing station in the Girja village, less than one mile from his parents’ house.  The following year, another washing station was constructed in Eltama, 30km from Girja. 

Dukamo then moved to Daye town in the Bensa district, setting up the mother washing station of Keramo (where the other Ethiopian coffee I have on offer comes from) called Qonqana. Eventually, a dry mill was added to provide facilities for naturally processed coffees. Asefa’s younger brother, Mulugeta Dukamo, is the co-founder of Daye Bensa Coffee exporters, and played a key role in the expansion of the washing stations. Today, Daye Bensa operates in six woredas: Bensa, Bura, Chabe, Hoko (Girja), Aroressa and Chire with 20 washing stations, five mills and three coffee farms. 

As well as coffee, producers in the region will plant other crops such as sugarcane, a variety of fruits and “Inset”; a common indigenous plant that can be prepared as food in different forms. Income from coffee is important for these small scale farmers.  Inputs are minimal – most coffee grown in the region is 100% organic, though not certified due to high certification costs. Farmers simply do not have the money to apply chemical fertilisers, pesticides, or herbicides.

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Free delivery on all orders £20 or over
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Information provided by Mercanta Limited